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On Sunday, March 31, 2019 at Crowell Concert Hall, John Spencer Camp Professor of Music Neely Bruce presented the seventeenth and final concert in a series of CD-length recitals of his piano music, featuring the Fifth Piano Sonata; the rest of the Friendly Fugues, including “A Double Fugue for Kay Briggs” (the widow of Professor Emeritus Morton W. Briggs), plus three world premieres including “A Fugue for Elena Bruce;” and the world premiere of a bonus fugue by Robert Carl on the name “Neely Bruce.”

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Friday, March 29, 2019 at Crowell Concert Hall, The Nubatones — leader and singer/songwriter Alsarah, percussionist Rami El-Aasser, bassist Mawuena Kodjovi, oud (stringed instrument) player Brandon Terzic, and background vocalist Nahid — performed lavish, joyful East African retro-pop, full of Arabic-language reflections on identity and survival.

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Sunday, March 3, 2019 A performance by Los Angeles-based experimental music group lucky dragons and Wesleyan community members took place on the final day of the Audible Bacillus exhibition.

Other Transformations is an experiment. It asks: What is fundamentally necessary for an image to be read as music? How do images translate between musical idea, performance, and the experience of listening? By sourcing from a vast archive of graphic musical representations, can we discover common patterns to use as access points and guidelines for performance? By reducing symbolic musical language to its basic forms, interpolating between different representations, and generating hybrids, mimics, and transitional shapes, what new models can we build for thinking musically with images?

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Saturday, March 2, 2019 As part of the symposium Canonicity Revisited, Archaeologies of Knowledge featured talks by Kishwar Rizvi from Yale University, and Claire Grace and Benjamin Chafee, both from Wesleyan University. The symposium was envisioned as a critical interrogation of the problem of canons and canonicity in art history. This subject was a matter of intense debate in the mid 1990s, unfurling across the pages of a number of major publications in the field. By then, revisionist approaches had already begun to transform the discipline’s operating assumptions about what constitutes its canonical texts and artifacts, and about the very meaning and value of canonicity itself. Art history’s reevaluation has only increased in recent years thanks to the crucial work, now decades in the making, of feminist, postcolonial, and queer interventions, and to the development of visual and cultural studies. Nevertheless, it seems to us that canons and their variants in many ways still shape—or perhaps haunt—both the teaching and scholarship of art history. What accounts for their persistence? And how do they bear down on art historical thinking today?

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

 

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 a concert in Crowell Concert Hall commemorating Jon Barlow took place, closing a full day of events. Jon Barlow was a visionary musician and teacher, whose mind ranged freely through an immense field of topics. A remarkable pianist, and an authority on topics as diverse as mathematics and the history of baseball, he had a profound impact on several generations of Wesleyan students. Participants will include John Spencer Camp Professor of Music Neely Bruce, Professor of Music Ron Kuivila, Alex Waterman, and Jonathan Zorn ’02 MA ’07.

Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Friday, February 8, 2019 the New England premiere of joyUS justUS (2018), a participatory urban Latin dance theater experience, took on joy as the ultimate expression of struggle and resistance against hardship and injustice, reclaiming the narrative of people of color by embodying stories about the beauty and power of hope, faith, and family. Los Angeles-based CONTRA-TIEMPO has created physically intense and politically astute performance work since 2005—collages of salsa, Afro-Cuban, hip hop, and contemporary dance with compelling text and original music.

Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 a walk through the exhibition Audible Bacillus took place with Smith Curator of Paleontology of the Joe Webb Peoples Museum of Natural History, Harold T. Stearns Professor of Integrative Sciences, and Research Professor, Earth and Environmental Sciences Ellen Thomas; Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow for Writing in the Social Sciences Tess Bird; Professor of Art Jeffrey Schiff; and Curator and Associate Director of Visual Arts Benjamin Chaffee.

Photos by Sandy Aldieri of Perceptions Photography. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

 

On Monday, February 18, 2019 artist, Sky Hopinka, gave a talk in conjunction with the exhibition, Audible Bacillus, which includes his work Anti-Objects, or Space Without Path or Boundary.
Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga) was born and raised in Ferndale, Washington and spent a number of years in Palm Springs and Riverside, California; Portland, Oregon; and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He is currently based out of Cambridge, Massachusetts. In Portland, he studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the lower Columbia River basin. His video work centers around personal positions of indigenous homeland and landscape, designs of language as containers of culture, and the play between the known and the unknowable. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Portland State University in Liberal Arts, and his Master of Fine Arts in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow for 2019.

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

On Thursday, February 14, 2019 “A Doll’s House, Part 3” (2018) showed at Ring Family Performing Arts Hall. “A Doll’s House, Part 3” picks up where Nora left off, after she picked up where she left off, after slamming the door on her husband and children in Henrik Ibsen’s original play in 1879. Michael Breslin and Patrick Foley’s sequel to the sequel is a searing examination of gender, sexuality, race, class, and hierarchy for the reality TV generation.

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

 

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 the opening reception for Bestiary was held at the Davison Art Center, with a gallery talk by Kari Weil, University Professor, Environmental Studies, College of the Environment and College of Letters, and Co-Coordinator, Animal Studies, and author of “Thinking Animals: Why Animal Studies Now” (Columbia, 2012).

Bestiary takes its inspiration from medieval compendia of wondrous creatures, both natural and fantastic. This exhibition stages creaturely encounters between gallery visitors and their non-human counterparts. In viewing these works, we might wonder at changing conceptions of bestial subjectivity across different cultural contexts and movements including the Renaissance, Romanticism, Surrealism, and our own contemporary moment. Works in this exhibition include an anonymous fifteenth-century engraving of a lion, a dragon, and a fox quarreling; a monumental lobster by Richard Mueller; and an ethereal anemone by Kiki Smith.

The exhibition will be on display through Thursday, March 7, 2019.

Photos by Richard Marinelli. Click here to view the full album on Flickr.

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